The SEO Quick Fix: Competitor Keywords, Redirect Chains, and Duplicate Content, Oh My!

Posted by ErinMcCaul

I have a eight-month-old baby. As a mom my time is at a premium, and I’ve come to appreciate functionalities I didn’t know existed in things I already pay for. My HBONow subscription has Game of Thrones AND Sesame Street? Fantastic! Overnight diapers can save me a trip to the tiny airplane bathroom on a quick flight? Sweet! Oxiclean keeps my towels fluffy and vanquishes baby poop stains? Flip my pancakes!

Moz Pro isn’t just a tool for link building, or keyword research, or on-page SEO, or crawling your site. It does all those things and a little bit more, simplifying your SEO work and saving time. And if you’ve run into an SEO task you’re not sure how to tackle, it’s possible that a tool you need is right here just waiting to be found! It’s in this spirit that we’ve revived our SEO Quick Fix videos. These 2–3 minute Mozzer-led tutorials are meant to help you get the most out of our tools, and offer simple solutions to common SEO problems.

Take Moz Pro for a spin!

Today we’ll focus on a few Keyword Explorer and Site Crawl tips. I hope these knowledge nuggets bring you the joy I experienced the moment I realized my son doesn’t care whether I read him The Name of the Wind or Goodnight Moon.

Let’s dive in!

Fix #1 – Keyword Explorer: Finding keyword suggestions that are questions

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Search queries all have intent (“when to give my baby water” was a hot Google search at my house recently). Here’s the good news: Research shows that if you’re already ranking in the top ten positions, providing the best answers to specific questions can earn you a coveted Featured Snippet!

Featured snippet example

In this video, April from our Customer Success Team will show you how to pull a list of keyword phrases that cover the who, what, where, when, why, and how of all the related topics for keywords you’re already ranking for. Here’s the rub. Different questions call for different Featured Snippet formats. For example, “how” and “have” questions tend to result in list-based snippets, while “which” questions often result in tables. When you’re crafting your content, be mindful of the type of question you’re targeting and format accordingly.

Looking for more resources? Once you’ve got your list, check out AJ Ghergich’s article on the Moz Blog for some in-depth insight on formatting and optimizing your snippets. High five!


Fix #2 – Site Crawl: Optimize the content on your site

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Sometimes if I find a really good pair of pants, I buy two (I mean, it’s really hard to find good pants). In this case duplicates are good, but the rules of pants don’t always apply to content. Chiaryn is here to teach you how to use Site Crawl to identify duplicate content and titles, and uncover opportunities to help customers and bots find more relevant content on your site.

When reviewing your duplicate content, keep a few things in mind:

  • Does this page provide value to visitors?
  • Title tags are meant to give searchers a taste of what your content is about, and meant to help bots understand and categorize your content. You want your title tags to be relevant and unique to your content.
  • If pages with different content have the same title tag, re-write your tags to make them more relevant to your page content. Use our Title Tag Preview tool to help out.
  • Thin content isn’t always a bad thing, but it’s still a good opportunity to make sure your page is performing as expected — and update it as necessary with meaningful content.
  • Check out Jo Cameron’s post about How to Turn Low-Value Content Into Neatly Organized Opportunities for more snazzy tips on duplicate content and Site Crawl!

Fix #3 – Keyword Explorer: Identify your competitors’ top keywords

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Cozily nestled under a few clicks, Keyword Explorer holds the keys to a competitive research sweet spot. By isolating the ranking keywords you have in common with your competitors, you can pinpoint their weak spots and discover keywords that are low-hanging fruit — phrases you have the content and authority to rank for that, with a little attention, could do even better. In this video, Janisha shows you how targeting a competitor’s low-ranking keywords can earn you a top spot in the SERPS.

Finding competitors' keywords: A Venn diagram

Check out all that overlapped opportunity!

For a few more tips along this line, check out Hayley Sherman’s post, How to Use Keyword Explorer to Identify Competitive Keyword Opportunities.


Fix #4 – Site Crawl: Identify and fix redirect chains

https://fast.wistia.net/embed/iframe/ylskjt9atd?seo=false&videoFoam=truehttps://fast.wistia.net/assets/external/E-v1.js

Redirects are a handy way to get a visitor from a page they try to land on, to the page you want them to land on. Redirect chains, however, are redirects gone wrong. They look something like this: URL A redirects to URL B, URL B redirects to URL C… and so on and so forth.

These redirect chains can negatively impact your rankings, slow your site load times, and make it hard for crawlers to properly index your site.

Meghan from our Help team is here to show you how to find redirect chains, understand where they currently exist, and help you cut a few of those pesky middle redirects.

Looking for a few other redirect resources? I’ve got you covered:


Alright friends, that’s a wrap! Like the end of The Last Jedi, you might not be ready for this post to be over. Fear not! Our blog editor liked my jokes so much that she’s promised to harp on me to write more blog posts. So, I need your help! Find yourself facing an SEO snafu that doesn’t seem to have a straightforward fix? Let me know in the comments. I might know a Moz tool that can help, and you might inspire another Quick Fix post!

Get a free month of Moz Pro

If you’re still interested in checking out more solutions, here’s a list of some of my favorite resources:

Stay cool!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


Source: https://moz.com/blog/seo-quick-fix

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Facebook’s new authorization process for political ads goes live in the US

Earlier this month — and before Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before Congress — the company announced a series of changes to how it would handle political advertisements running on its platform in the future. It had said that people who wanted to buy a political ad — including ads about political “issues” — would have to reveal their identities and location and be verified before the ads could run. Information about the advertiser would also display to Facebook users.

Today, Facebook is announcing the authorization process for U.S. political ads is live.

Facebook had first said in October that political advertisers would have to verify their identity and location for election-related ads. But in April, it expanded that requirement to include any “issue ads” — meaning those on political topics being debated across the country, not just those tied to an election.

Facebook said it would work with third parties to identify the issues. These ads would then be labeled as “Political Ads,” and display the “paid for by” information to end users.

According to today’s announcement, Facebook will now begin to verify the identity and the residential mailing address of advertisers who want to run political ads. Those advertisers will also have to disclose who’s paying for the ads as part of this authorization process.

This verification process is currently only open in the U.S. and will require Page admins and ad account admins to submit their government-issued ID to Facebook, along with their residential mailing address.

The government ID can either be a U.S. passport or U.S. driver’s license, a FAQ explains. Facebook will also ask for the last four digits of admins’ Social Security Number. The photo ID will then be approved or denied in a matter of minutes, though anyone declined based on the quality of the uploaded images won’t be prevented from trying again.

The address, however, will be verified by mailing a letter with a unique access code that only the admin’s Facebook account can use. The letter may take up to 10 days to arrive, Facebook notes.

Along with the verification portion, Page admins will also have to fill in who paid for the ad in the “disclaimer” section. This has to include the organization(s) or person’s name(s) who funded it.

This information will also be reviewed prior to approval, but Facebook isn’t going to fact check this field, it seems.

Instead, the company simply says: “We’ll review each disclaimer to make sure it adheres to our advertising policies. You can edit your disclaimers at any time, but after each edit, your disclaimer will need to be reviewed again, so it won’t be immediately available to use.”

The FAQ later states that disclaimers must comply with “any applicable law,” but again says that Facebook only reviews them against its ad policies.

“It’s your responsibility as the advertiser to independently assess and ensure that your ads are in compliance with all applicable election and advertising laws and regulations,” the documentation reads.

Along with the launch of the new authorization procedures, Facebook has released a Blueprint training course to guide advertisers through the steps required, and has published an FAQ to answer advertisers’ questions.

Of course, these procedures will only net the more scrupulous advertisers willing to play by the rules. That’s why Facebook had said before that it plans to use AI technology to help sniff out those advertisers who should have submitted to verification, but did not. The company is also asking people to report suspicious ads using the “Report Ad” button.

Facebook has been under heavy scrutiny because of how its platform was corrupted by Russian trolls on a mission to sway the 2016 election. The Justice Department charged 13 Russians and three companies with election interference earlier this year, and Facebook has removed hundreds of accounts associated with disinformation campaigns.

While tougher rules around ads may help, they alone won’t solve the problem.

It’s likely that those determined to skirt the rules will find their own workarounds. Plus, ads are only one of many issues in terms of those who want to use Facebook for propaganda and misinformation. On other fronts, Facebook is dealing with fake news — including everything from biased stories to those that are outright lies, intending to influence public opinion. And of course there’s the Cambridge Analytica scandal, which led to intense questioning of Facebook’s data privacy practices in the wake of revelations that millions of Facebook users had their information improperly accessed.

Facebook says the political ads authorization process is gradually rolling out, so it may not be available to all advertisers at this time. Currently, users can only set up and manage authorizations from a desktop computer from the Authorizations tab in a Facebook Page’s Settings.


Source: https://techcrunch.com/2018/04/23/facebooks-new-authorization-process-for-political-ads-goes-live-in-the-u-s/

Facebook face-recognition error looks awkward ahead of GDPR

A Facebook face recognition notification slip-up hints at how risky the company’s approach to compliance with a tough new European data protection standard could turn out to be.

On Friday a Metro journalist in the UK reported receiving a notification about the company’s face-recognition technology — which told him “the setting is on.”

The wording was curious, as the technology has been switched off in Europe since 2012, after regulatory pressure, and — as part of changes related to its GDPR compliance strategy — Facebook has also said it will be asking European users to choose individually whether or not they want to switch it on. (And on Friday begun rolling out its new consent flow in the region, ahead of the regulation applying next month.)

The company has since confirmed to us that the message was sent to the user in error — saying the wording came from an earlier notification which it sent to users who already had its facial recognition tech enabled, starting in December. And that it had intended to send the person a similar notification — containing the opposite notification, i.e. that “the setting is off”.

“We’re asking everyone in the EU whether they want to enable face recognition, and only people who affirmatively give their consent will have these features enabled. We did not intend for anyone in the EU to see this type of message, and we can confirm that this error did not result in face recognition being enabled without the person’s consent,” a Facebook spokesperson told us.

Here are the two notifications in question showing the setting on versus the setting off wordings:

This is interesting because Facebook has repeatedly refused to confirm it will be universally applying GDPR compliance measures across its entire global user-base.

Instead it has restricted its public commitments to saying the same “settings and controls” will be made available for users — which as we’ve previously pointed out avoids committing the company to a universal application of GDPR principles, such as privacy by design.

Given that Facebook’s facial recognition feature has been switched off in Europe since 2012 “the setting is on” message would presumably have only been sent to users in the US or Canada — where Facebook has been able to forge ahead with pushing people to accept the controversial, privacy-hostile technology, embedding it into features such as auto-tagging for photo uploads.

But it hardly bodes well for Facebook’s compliance with the EU’s strict new data protection standard if its systems are getting confused about whether or not a user is an EU person.

Facebook claims no data was processed without consent as a result of the wrong notification being sent — but under GDPR it could face investigations by data protection authorities seeking to verify whether or not an individual’s rights were violated. (Reminder: GDPR fines can scale as high as 4% of a company’s global annual turnover so privacy enforcement is at last getting teeth.)

Facebook’s appetite for continuing to push privacy hostile features on its user-base is clear. This strategic direction also comes from the very top of the company.

Earlier this month CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg urged US lawmakers not to impede US companies from be using people’s data for sensitive use-cases like facial recognition — attempting to gloss that tough sell by claiming pro-privacy rules would risk the US falling behind China.

Meanwhile, last week it also emerged that Zuckerberg’s company will switch the location where most international users’ data is processed from its international HQ, Facebook Ireland, to Facebook USA. From next month only EU users will have their data controller located in the EU — other international users, who would have at least technically fallen under GDPR’s reach otherwise, on account of their data being processed in the region, are being shifted out of the EU jurisdiction — via a unilateral T&Cs change.

This move seems intended to try to shrink some of Facebook’s legal liabilities by reducing the number of international users that would, at least technically, fall under the reach of the EU regulation — which both applies to anyone in the EU whose data is being processed and also extends EU fundamental rights extraterritorially, carrying the aforementioned major penalties for violations.

However Facebook’s decision to reduce how many of its users have their data processed in the EU also looks set to raise the stakes — if, as it appears, the company intends to exploit the lack of a comprehensive privacy framework in the US to apply different standards for North American users (and from next month also for non-EU international users, whose data will be processed there).

The problem is, if Facebook does not perform perfect segregation and management of these two separate pools of users it risks accidentally processing the personal data of Europeans in violation of the strict new EU standard, which applies from May 25.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Yet here it is, on the cusp of the new rules, sending the wrong notification and incorrectly telling an EU user that facial recognition is on.

Given how much risk it’s creating for itself by trying to run double standards for data protection you almost have to wonder whether Facebook is trying to engineer in some compliance wiggle room for itself — i.e. by positioning itself to be able to claim that such and such’s data was processed in error.

Another interesting question is whether the unilateral switching of ~1.5BN non-EU international users to Facebook USA as data controller could be interpreted as a data transfer to a third country — which would trigger other data protection requirements under EU law, and further layer on the legal complexity…

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

What is clear is that legal challenges to Facebook’s self-serving interpretation of EU law are coming.


Source: https://techcrunch.com/2018/04/23/facebook-face-recognition-error-looks-awkward-ahead-of-gdpr/

How these 10 Trendsetting Companies use Product Tutorials to Activate Every Single Sign Up

If you’re looking to take your business to the next level and help your products stand out, you can’t afford to ignore the power of product tutorials.

Ever tried to use a product without any instructions? It’s not a fun process, is it?

Product tutorials solve that problem by helping current and future customers understand the value of what you’re selling because they showcase exactly how to use it.

But when a product tutorial is too lengthy, too complicated, or doesn’t look like something your customer needs, they might end up abandoning it all together.

And that’s not a good sales strategy for anyone.

Because the end goal isn’t to get a customer, it’s to keep a customer.

And that means creating a product tutorial that makes it super easy for a new customer to start using—and succeed at using—your product.

So much so that they want to keep on using it. You know, forever.

Here are a few companies that did just that.

1. Buffer keeps it simple

The global average for cart abandonment across desktop, tablet, and mobile devices is a staggering 77.24%.

cart abandonment rates across devices

That means there is an extremely likely chance you’ll lose your hard-won customers before they even make it through the onboarding process.

Avoid this classic pitfall by keeping your product tutorial super simple. Just like Buffer.

To get started, you just have to connect your social network accounts.

connect a social account on buffer

And compose your first social media post.

compose a post on buffer

Buffer sends a series of onboarding emails to customers to help them navigate their service, starting with this welcome email:

welcome to buffer onboarding email

The email cross-promotes the Buffer browser extension and provides a brief breakdown of why it’s useful.

A few days later, the company sends a similar email that explains their Android and iOS app.

take buffer with you onboarding email

The entire signup process takes less than five minutes and is virtually foolproof. The onboarding email series guides customers along the way without overwhelming them.

The Co-Founder of Buffer, Leo Widrich, explained it best in this Chargify blog post:

“As entrepreneurs we’re often so excited about the possibilities of our product that we feel like we need to show our customers everything the second they sign up for our product.

Instead of doing that, at Buffer we focused on taking a step back and think about what the most successful customers did when they first joined Buffer.”

Try a similar approach with a series of short onboarding emails about your products and services.

Mint breaks their product tutorials down into small tasks to keep things simple, transparent, and easy.

2. Mint breaks it down into smaller tasks

The goal of many online products is to make something that is ordinarily complex, simple.

Mint, a financial services company, allows customers to view all of their banking accounts, credit cards, loans, investment accounts, and properties in one place.

But to see all of this information in one spot, a user first has to sort through all of their accounts, remember usernames and passwords, and upload them to Mint.

As you can imagine, this can be a rather arduous task.

That’s why Mint breaks up a rather lengthy onboarding process into just one task: Add a bank account.

That’s it. Just one bank account.

see your money in one place mint.com

Once a customer has added an account, they can already see a small picture of their finances.

They already have a taste of success.

It’s so easy—and so gratifying—that it makes them want to do it again. And again.

And the onboarding emails sent by Mint are one of many reasons why the company grew to 1.5 million users in just two years.

Once customers sign up for the service, Mint sends out a welcome email to help users “manage their money” in five short steps.

mint onboarding email

From there, users receive customized weekly emails summarizing their account activity.

mint heres how you're doing

By simplifying a complex process into smaller, more manageable steps, you’ll increase the likelihood that your customer will stick around to complete them.

It doesn’t hurt to have a little fun throughout the process.

3. Canva makes it fun

Virgin America rocked the airline industry when they introduced a safety video people actually wanted to watch.

It was so good that more than 12 million people voluntarily watched it on YouTube—without ever stepping foot on an airplane.

Your product tutorial can be the fun part. Take Canva for example. Their growth process is simple, fun, and proven to work.

canvas growth process

Once the customer opens the program, they’re immediately taken through the process of creating their first Canva design.

The customer can pick what they want to use the design platform for.

canva onboarding

And what they want to design.

canva i want to create a

Then Canva uses animation to show them how to create design elements.

As the customer works their way through the design process, they can choose the colors, fonts, graphics, and design elements they want to create just about anything.

The fun, personalized product tutorial resulted in a 10% boost in activation for the company.

Canva’s emails are just as fun. They list which “Canva member number” that each new user is:

canva thanks for being amazing

You can find similar success by creating exciting product tutorials and onboarding emails.

4. Evernote gets you to start now

As Ankit Jain puts it, “The key to [product tutorial] success is to get the users hooked during that critical first 3-7 day period.”

That means your customer needs to experience a taste of what your product has to offer as quickly as possible.

That’s exactly what Evernote does.

The note-taking program gives customers an opportunity to stay organized while keeping track of their meeting notes.

To get customers hooked, Evernote wants their customers to write their first notes right away.

So the second the customer signs-up there is a note there waiting for them.

evernote getting started

It tells them how to compose their first note and all the fun things they can do with it.
Once the customer starts taking notes, they’ll likely be hooked.

In fact, they might eventually have so many notes that they need to pay for a premium Evernote account.

That’s probably why more than 220 million users use Evernote.

Evernote introduces new users to their service with a series of onboarding emails that teach them how to use the service to its full potential.

evernote tips

The series starts with a welcome email that wastes no time at all. There is a “Download Evernote” button right in the email body.

download evernote email

Cut to the chase quicker, just like Evernote, to activate more of your sign-ups.

5. Maven makes it personal

We know that email marketing is much more effective when it’s personalized. So why aren’t our product tutorials personalized as well?

For example, remember when doctors used to make house calls? Yeah me neither.

Despite the fact that house calls were way before my time, I still yearn for that level of personalized care.

I don’t want to look up answers to my health challenges online. That does nothing to reassure me.

And I don’t want to go to an urgent care clinic where no one knows me. They’ll just prescribe me something I don’t need.

Instead, I want to feel heard. I want to feel as though I’m taken care of.

And that’s exactly what Maven Clinic taps into.

maven homepage in 2018

Maven Clinic allows customers to schedule video appointments with doctors, physical therapists, and mental health professionals.

Even though it operates entirely online, it still feels personal, and they reinforce that level of intimacy throughout the entire product tutorial process.

And the company’s emails follow the exact same tone.

welcome to maven

Maven’s founder, Kate Ryder, says that this personal touch is what makes the company such a success.

“The responses we get from clients after launching Maven are fantastic — they get great feedback from their employees about how this sends a positive message about supporting a family-friendly culture.”

The second a customer signs-up they receive a welcome note from their own personal wellness coordinator.

Facebook face recognition error looks awkward ahead of GDPR

A Facebook face recognition notification slip-up hints at how risky the company’s approach to compliance with a tough new European data protection standard could turn out to be.

On Friday a Metro journalist in the UK reported receiving a notification about the company’s face recognition technology — which told him “the setting is on”.

The wording was curious as the technology has been switched off in Europe since 2012, after regulatory pressure, and — as part of changes related to its GDPR compliance strategy — Facebook has also said it will be asking European users to choose individually whether or not they want to switch it on. (And on Friday begun rolling out its new consent flow in the region, ahead of the regulation applying next month.)

The company has since confirmed to us that the message was sent to the user in error — saying the wording came from an earlier notification which it sent to users who already had its facial recognition tech enabled, starting in December. And that it had intended to send the person a similar notification — containing the opposite notification, i.e. that “the setting is off”.

“We’re asking everyone in the EU whether they want to enable face recognition, and only people who affirmatively give their consent will have these features enabled. We did not intend for anyone in the EU to see this type of message, and we can confirm that this error did not result in face recognition being enabled without the person’s consent,” a Facebook spokesperson told us.

Here are the two notifications in question — showing the setting on vs the setting off wordings:

This is interesting because Facebook has repeatedly refused to confirm it will be universally applying GDPR compliance measures across its entire global user-base.

Instead it has restricted its public commitments to saying the same “settings and controls” will be made available for users — which as we’ve previously pointed out avoids committing the company to a universal application of GDPR principles, such as privacy by design.

Given that Facebook’s facial recognition feature has been switched off in Europe since 2012 “the setting is on” message would presumably have only been sent to users in the US or Canada — where Facebook has been able to forge ahead with pushing people to accept the controversial, privacy-hostile technology, embedding it into features such as auto-tagging for photo uploads.

But it hardly bodes well for Facebook’s compliance with the EU’s strict new data protection standard if its systems are getting confused about whether or not a user is an EU person.

Facebook claims no data was processed without consent as a result of the wrong notification being sent — but under GDPR it could face investigations by data protection authorities seeking to verify whether or not an individual’s rights were violated. (Reminder: GDPR fines can scale as high as 4% of a company’s global annual turnover so privacy enforcement is at last getting teeth.)

Facebook’s appetite for continuing to push privacy hostile features on its user-base is clear. This strategic direction also comes from the very top of the company.

Earlier this month CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg urged US lawmakers not to impede US companies from be using people’s data for sensitive use-cases like facial recognition — attempting to gloss that tough sell by claiming pro-privacy rules would risk the US falling behind China.

Meanwhile, last week it also emerged that Zuckerberg’s company will switch the location where most international users’ data is processed from its international HQ, Facebook Ireland, to Facebook USA. From next month only EU users will have their data controller located in the EU — other international users, who would have at least technically fallen under GDPR’s reach otherwise, on account of their data being processed in the region, are being shifted out of the EU jurisdiction — via a unilateral T&Cs change.

This move seems intended to try to shrink some of Facebook’s legal liabilities by reducing the number of international users that would, at least technically, fall under the reach of the EU regulation — which both applies to anyone in the EU whose data is being processed and also extends EU fundamental rights extraterritorially, carrying the aforementioned major penalties for violations.

However Facebook’s decision to reduce how many of its users have their data processed in the EU also looks set to raise the stakes — if, as it appears, the company intends to exploit the lack of a comprehensive privacy framework in the US to apply different standards for North American users (and from next month also for non-EU international users, whose data will be processed there).

The problem is, if Facebook does not perform perfect segregation and management of these two separate pools of users it risks accidentally processing the personal data of Europeans in violation of the strict new EU standard, which applies from May 25.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Yet here it is, on the cusp of the new rules, sending the wrong notification and incorrectly telling an EU user that facial recognition is on.

Given how much risk it’s creating for itself by trying to run double standards for data protection you almost have to wonder whether Facebook is trying to engineer in some compliance wiggle room for itself — i.e. by positioning itself to be able to claim that such and such’s data was processed in error.

Another interesting question is whether the unilateral switching of ~1.5BN non-EU international users to Facebook USA as data controller could be interpreted as a data transfer to a third country — which would trigger other data protection requirements under EU law, and further layer on the legal complexity…

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

What is clear is that legal challenges to Facebook’s self-serving interpretation of EU law are coming.


Source: https://techcrunch.com/2018/04/23/facebook-face-recognition-error-looks-awkward-ahead-of-gdpr/

Facebook hit with defamation lawsuit over fake ads

In an interesting twist, Facebook is being sued in the UK for defamation by consumer advice personality, Martin Lewis, who says his face and name have been repeatedly used on fake adverts distributed on the social media giant’s platform.

Lewis, who founded the popular MoneySavingExpert.com tips website, says Facebook has failed to stop the fake ads despite repeat complaints and action on his part, thereby — he contends — tarnishing his reputation and causing victims to be lured into costly scams.

“It is consistent, it is repeated. Other companies such as Outbrain who have run these adverts have taken them down. What is particularly pernicious about Facebook is that it says the onus is on me, so I have spent time and effort and stress repeatedly to have them taken down,” Lewis told The Guardian.

“It is facilitating scams on a constant basis in a morally repugnant way. If Mark Zuckerburg wants to be the champion of moral causes, then he needs to stop its company doing this.”

In a blog post Lewis also argues it should not be difficult for Facebook — “a leader in face and text recognition” — to prevent scammers from misappropriating his image.

“I don’t do adverts. I’ve told Facebook that. Any ad with my picture or name in is without my permission. I’ve asked it not to publish them, or at least to check their legitimacy with me before publishing. This shouldn’t be difficult,” he writes. “Yet it simply continues to repeatedly publish these adverts and then relies on me to report them, once the damage has been done.”

“Enough is enough. I’ve been fighting for over a year to stop Facebook letting scammers use my name and face to rip off vulnerable people – yet it continues. I feel sick each time I hear of another victim being conned because of trust they wrongly thought they were placing in me. One lady had over £100,000 taken from her,” he adds.

Some of the fake ads appear to be related to cryptocurrency scams — linking through to fake news articles promising “revolutionary Bitcoin home-based opportunity”.

So the scammers look to be using the same playbook as the Macedonian teens who, in 2016, concocted fake news stories about US politics to generate a mint in ad clicks — also relying on Facebook’s platform to distribute their fakes and scale the scam.

In January Facebook revised its ads policy to specifically ban cryptocurrency, binary options and initial coin offerings. But as Lewis’ samples show, the scammers are circumventing this prohibition with ease — using Lewis’ image to drive unwitting clicks to a secondary offsite layer of fake news articles that directly push people towards crypto scams.

It would appear that Facebook does nothing to verify the sites to which ads on its platform are directing its users, just as it does not appear to proactive police whether ad creative is legal — at least unless nudity is involved.

Here’s one sample fake ad that Lewis highlights:

And here’s the fake news article it links to — touting a “revolutionary” Bitcoin opportunity, in a news article style mocked up to look like the Daily Mirror newspaper…

The lawsuit is a personal action by Lewis who is seeking exemplary damages in the high court. He says he’s not looking to profit himself — saying he would donate any winnings to charities that aim to combat fraud. Rather he says he’s taking the action in the hopes the publicity will spotlight the problem and force Facebook to stamp out fake ads.

In a statement, Mark Lewis of the law firm Seddons, which Lewis has engaged for the action, said: “Facebook is not above the law – it cannot hide outside the UK and think that it is untouchable.  Exemplary damages are being sought. This means we will ask the court to ensure they are substantial enough that Facebook can’t simply see paying out damages as just the ‘cost of business’ and carry on regardless. It needs to be shown that the price of causing misery is very high.”

In a response statement to the suit, a Facebook spokesperson told us: “We do not allow adverts which are misleading or false on Facebook and have explained to Martin Lewis that he should report any adverts that infringe his rights and they will be removed. We are in direct contact with his team, offering to help and promptly investigating their requests, and only last week confirmed that several adverts and accounts that violated our Advertising Policies had been taken down.”

Facebook’s ad guidelines do indeed prohibit ads that contain “deceptive, false, or misleading content, including deceptive claims, offers, or business practices” — and, as noted above, they also specifically prohibit cryptocurrency-related ads.

But, as is increasingly evident where big tech platforms are concerned, meaningful enforcement of existing policies is what’s sorely lacking.

The social behemoth claims to have invested significant resources in its ad review program — which includes both automated and manual review of ads. Though it also relies on users reporting problem content, thereby shifting the burden of actively policing content its systems are algorithmically distributing and monetizing (at massive scale) onto individual users (who are, by the by, not being paid for all this content review labor… hmmm… ).

In Lewis’ case the burden is clearly also highly personal, given the fake ads are not just dodgy content but are directly misappropriating his image and name in an attempt to sell a scam.

“On a personal note, as well as the huge amount of time, stress and effort it takes to continually combat these scams, this whole episode has been extremely depressing – to see my reputation besmirched by such a big company, out of an unending greed to keep raking in its ad cash,” he also writes.

The sheer scale of Facebook’s platform — which now has more than 2BN active users globally — contrasts awkwardly with the far smaller number of people the company employs for content moderation tasks.

And unsurprisingly, given that huge discrepancy, Facebook has been facing increasing pressure over various types of problem content in recent years — from Kremlin propaganda to hate speech in Myanmar.

Last year it told US lawmakers it would be increasing the number of staff working on safety and security issues from 10,000 to 20,000 by the end of this year. Which is still a tiny drop in the ocean of content distributed daily on its platform. We’ve asked how many people work in Facebook’s ad review team specifically and will update this post with any response.

Given the sheer scale of content continuously generated by a 2BN+ user-base, combined with a platform structure that typically allows for instant uploads, a truly robust enforcement of Facebook’s own policies is going to require legislative intervention.

And, in the meanwhile, Facebook operating a policy that’s essentially unenforceable risks looking intentional — given how much profit the company continues to generate by being able to claim it’s just a platform, rather than be ruled like a publisher.


Source: https://techcrunch.com/2018/04/23/facebook-hit-with-defamation-lawsuit-over-fake-ads/

ROPO: 2018’s Most Important Multichannel Digital Marketing Report

Posted by RobBeirne

Digital marketers have always had one drum they loudly beat in front of traditional advertising channels: “We can measure what we do better than you.” Now, we weren’t embellishing the truth or anything — we can measure digital advertising performance at a much more granular level than we can traditional advertising. But it’s not perfect. Multichannel digital marketing teams always have one niggling thought that keeps them awake at night: online activity is driving in-store sales and we can’t claim any credit for it.

Offline sales are happening. Sure enough, we’re seeing online shopping become more and more popular, but even so, you’ll never see 100% of your sales being made online if you’re a multichannel retailer. Whether it’s a dress that needs to be tried on or a TV you want to measure up before you buy, in-store purchases are going nowhere. But it’s more important than ever to make sure you don’t underestimate the impact your online advertising has on offline sales.

ROPO: Research Online Purchase Offline has plagued multichannel retailers for years. This is when awareness and hot leads are generated online, but the customers convert in-store.

There is one other problem hampering many multichannel businesses: viewing their online store as “just another store” and, in many cases, the store managers themselves considering the website to be a competitor.

In this article, I’ll show you how we’ve improvised to create a ROPO report for DID Electrical, an Irish electrical and home appliance multichannel retailer, to provide greater insight into their customers’ multichannel journey and how this affected their business.

What is ROPO reporting?

Offline conversions are a massive blind spot for digital marketers. It’s the same as someone else taking credit for your work: your online ads are definitely influencing shoppers who complete their purchase offline, but we can’t prove it. Or at least we couldn’t prove it — until now.

ROPO reporting (Research Online Purchase Offline) allows multichannel retailers to see what volume of in-store sales have been influenced by online ads. Facebook has trail-blazed in this area of reporting, leaving Google in their wake and scrambling to keep up. I know this well, because I work on Wolfgang’s PPC team and gaze enviously at the ROPO reporting abilities of our social team. Working with DID, we created a robust way to measure the offline value of both PPC and SEO activity online.

To create a ROPO report, multichannel retailers must have a digital touch point in-store. This isn’t as complicated as it sounds and can be something like an e-receipt or warranty system where you email customers. This gives you the customer data that you’ll need to match offline conversions with your online advertising activity.

As I mentioned earlier, Facebook makes this nice and simple. You take the data gathered in-store, upload it to Facebook, and they will match as many people as possible. Our social team is generally seeing a 50% match rate between the data gathered in-store and Facebook users who’ve seen our ads. You can watch two of my colleagues, Alan and Roisin, discussing social ROPO reporting in an episode of our new video series, Wolfgang Bites:

Clearly, ROPO reporting is potentially very powerful for social media marketers, but Google doesn’t yet provide a way for me to simply upload offline conversion data and match it against people who’ve seen my ads (though they have said that this is coming for Google AdWords). Wouldn’t this be a really boring article for people working in SEO and PPC if I just ended things there?

Google ROPO reporting

DID Electrical were a perfect business to develop a ROPO report for. Founded back in 1968 (happy 50th birthday guys!), a year before tech was advanced enough to put man on the moon, DID strives to “understand the needs of each and every one of their customers.” DID have an innovative approach to multichannel retail, which is great for ROPO reporting because they’re already offering e-receipts to customers purchasing goods for over €100. Better still, the email delivering the e-receipts also has a link to a dedicated competition. This sits on a hidden landing page, so the only visitors to this page are customers receiving e-receipts.

They were nearly set for ROPO reporting, but there was just one extra step needed. In Google Analytics, we set the unique competition landing page URL as a goal, allowing us to reverse-engineer customer journeys and uncover the extent of Google PPC and SEO’s influence over in-store sales. Before I unveil the results, a few caveats.

The ROPO under-report

Despite our best efforts to track offline conversions, I can’t say ROPO reporting reflects 100% of all in-store sales influenced by digital ads. In the past, we’ve been open about the difficulties in tracking both offline conversions and cross-device conversions. For example, when running a social ROPO report, customers might give a different email in-store from the one attached to their Facebook account. For an SEO or PPC ROPO report, the customer might click a search ad on a work computer but the open their e-receipt on their smartphone. Unfortunately, due to the nature of the beast, ROPO reporting just isn’t 100% accurate, but it does give an incredible indication of online’s influence over offline sales.

I expect to see improved reporting coming down the line from Google, and they’re definitely working on a ROPO reporting solution like Facebook’s upload system. While our approach to ROPO reporting does shine a light on the offline conversion blind spot, it’s entirely likely that digital advertising’s influence goes far beyond these (still mightily impressive) results.

It’s also important to note that this method isn’t intended to give an exact figure for every ROPO sale, but instead gives us an excellent idea of the proportion of offline sales impacted by our online activities. By applying these proportions to overall business figures, we can work out a robust estimate for metrics like offline ROI.

Results from ROPO reporting

I’m going to divide the results of this ROPO reporting innovation into three sections:

  1. PPC Results
  2. SEO Results
  3. Business Results

1. PPC results of ROPO reporting

First of all, we found 47% of offline customers had visited the DID Electrical website prior to visiting the store and making a purchase. Alone, this was an incredible insight into consumer behavior to be able to offer the team at DID. We went even further and determined that 1 in 8 measurable offline sales were influenced by an AdWords click.

2. SEO results of ROPO reporting

This method of ROPO reporting also means we can check the value of an organic click-through using the same reverse-engineering we used for PPC clicks. Based on the same data set, we discovered 1 in 5 purchases made in-store were made by customers who visited the DID site through an organic click prior to visiting the store.

3. Business results of ROPO reporting

ROPO reporting proved to be a great solution to DID’s needs in providing clarity around the position of their website in the multichannel experience. With at least 47% of offline shoppers visiting the site before purchasing, 1 in 8 of them being influenced by AdWords and 1 in 5 by SEO, DID could now show the impact online was having over in-store sales. Internally, the website was no longer being viewed as just another store — now it’s viewed as the hub linking everything together for an improved customer experience.

Following the deeper understanding into multichannel retail offered by ROPO reporting, DID was also able to augment their budget allocations between digital and traditional channels more efficiently. These insights have enabled them to justify moving more of their marketing budget online. Digital will make up 50% more of their overall marketing budget in 2018!

Getting started with ROPO reporting

If you’re a digital marketer within a multichannel retailer and you want to get started with ROPO reporting, the key factor is your in-store digital touchpoint. This is the bridge between your online advertising and offline conversion data. If you’re not offering e-receipts already, now is the time to start considering them as they played a critical role in DID’s ROPO strategy.

ROPO Cheat Guide (or quick reference)

If you’re a multichannel retailer and this all sounds tantalizing, here’s the customer journey which ROPO measures:

  1. Customer researches online using your website
  2. Customer makes purchase in your brick-and-mortar store
  3. Customer agrees to receive an e-receipt or warranty delivered to their email address
  4. Customer clicks a competition link in the communication they receive
  5. This action is captured in your Google Analytics as a custom goal completion
  6. You can now calculate ROAS (Return On Advertising Spending)

The two critical steps here are the digital touchpoint in your physical stores and the incentive for the customer’s post-conversion communication click. Once you have this touchpoint and interaction, measuring Facebook’s social ROPO is a simple file upload and using what I’ve shown you above, you’ll be able to measure the ROPO impact of PPC and SEO too.

If you do have any questions, pop them into the comments below. I have some questions too and it would be great to hear what you all think:

  • If you’re a multichannel retailer, are you in a position to start ROPO reporting?
  • Does your company view your website as a hub for all stores or just another store (or even a competitor to the physical stores)?
  • Have you seen a shift in marketing spend towards digital?

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


Source: https://moz.com/blog/ropo-report

Google confirms some of its own services are now getting blocked in Russia over the Telegram ban

A shower of paper airplanes darted through the skies of Moscow and other towns in Russia today, as users answered the call of entrepreneur Pavel Durov to send the blank missives out of their windows at a pre-appointed time in support of Telegram, a messaging app he founded that was blocked last week by Russian regulator Roskomnadzor (RKN) that uses a paper airplane icon. RKN believes the service is violating national laws by failing to provide it with encryption keys to access messages on the service (Telegram has refused to comply).

The paper plane send-off was a small, flashmob turn in a “Digital Resistance” — Durov’s preferred term — that has otherwise largely been played out online: currently, nearly 18 million IP addresses are knocked out. And in the latest development, Google has now confirmed to us that its own services are now also being impacted.

From what we understand, Google Search, Gmail and push notifications for Android apps are among the products being affected.

“We are aware of reports that some users in Russia are unable to access some Google products, and are investigating those reports,” said a Google spokesperson in an emailed response. We’ve been trying to contact Google all week about the Telegram blockade, and this is the first time that the company has both replied and acknowledged something related to it.

(Amazon has acknowledged our messages but has yet to reply to them.)

Google’s comments come on the heels of RKN itself also announcing today that it had expanded its IP blocks to Google’s services. At its peak, RKN had blocked nearly 19 million IP addresses, with dozens of third-party services that also use Google Cloud and Amazon’s AWS, such as Twitch and Spotify, also getting caught in the crossfire,

Russia is among the countries in the world that has enforced a kind of digital firewall, blocking periodically or permanently certain online content. Some turn to VPNs to access that content anyway, but it turns out that Telegram hasn’t needed to rely on that workaround to get used.

“RKN is embarrassingly bad at blocking Telegram, so most people keep using it without any intermediaries,” said Ilya Andreev, COO and co-founder of Vee Security, which has been providing a proxy service to bypass the ban. Currently, it is supporting up to 2 million users simultaneously, although this is a relatively small proportion considering Telegram has around 14 million users in the country (and, likely, more considering all the free publicity it’s been getting).

As we described earlier this week, the reason so many IP addresses are getting blocked is because Telegram has been using a technique that allows it to “hop” to a new IP address when the one that it’s using is blocked from getting accessed by RKN. It’s a technique that a much smaller app, Zello, had also resorted to using for nearly a year when the RKN announced its own ban.

Zello ceased its activities when RKN got wise to Zello’s ways and chose to start blocking entire subnetworks of IP addresses to avoid so many hops, and Amazon’s AWS and Google Cloud kindly asked Zello to stop as other services also started to get blocked. So, when Telegram started the same kind of hopping, RKN, in effect, knew just what to do to turn the screws.

So far Telegram’s cloud partners have held strong and have not taken the same route, although getting its own services blocked could see Google’s resolve tested at a new level.

Some believe that one outcome could be the regulator playing out an elaborate game of chicken with Telegram and the rest of the internet companies that are in some way aiding and abetting it, spurred in part by Russia’s larger profile and how such blocks would appear to international audiences.

“Russia can’t keep blocking random things on the Internet,” Andreev said. “Russia is working hard to make its image more alluring to foreigners in preparation for the World Cup,” which is taking place this June and July. “They can’t have tourists coming and realising Google doesn’t work in Russia.”

 

We’ll update this post and continue to write on further developments as we learn more.


Source: https://techcrunch.com/2018/04/22/google-confirms-some-of-its-own-services-are-now-getting-blocked-in-russia-over-the-telegram-ban/

SmugMug acquires Flickr

Two photo-sharing services are teaming up, as SmugMug buys Flickr from Verizon’s digital media subsidiary Oath.

USA Today broke the news and interviewed SmugMug CEO Don MacAskill, who said he hopes to revitalize Flickr .

At the same time, he said he’s still figuring out his actual plans: “It sounds silly for the CEO to not to totally know what he’s going to do, but we haven’t built SmugMug on a master plan either. We try to listen to our customers and when enough of them ask for something that’s important to them or to the community, we go and build it.”

Flickr was founded in 2004 and sold to Yahoo a year later. Yahoo, in turn, was acquired by Verizon, which brought it together with AOL to create a new subsidiary called Oath.

Over the past couple months, Oath (which owns TechCrunch) has been selling off some of its AOL and Yahoo properties, including Moviefone (sold to the company behind MoviePass, which Oath now has a stake in) and Polyvore (assets sold to Ssense).

In an FAQ about the deal, SmugMug says it will continue to operate Flickr as a separate site, with no merging of user accounts or photos: “Over time, we’ll be migrating Flickr onto SmugMug’s technology infrastructure, and your Flickr photos will move as a part of this migration — but the photos themselves will remain on Flickr.”

The company also uses the FAQ to describe its vision for the combined services:

SmugMug and Flickr represent the world’s most influential community of photographers, and there is strength in numbers. We want to provide photographers with both inspiration and the tools they need to tell their stories. We want to bring excitement and energy to inspire more photographers to share their perspective. And we want to be a welcome place for all photographers: hobbyist to archivist to professional.

The financial terms were not disclosed.


Source: https://techcrunch.com/2018/04/20/smugmug-acquires-flickr/

Featured Snippets: A Data Driven Way to Rank Faster

If SEO were an Olympic sport, it would be race walking.

Everyone is after that first place slot – but it’s a long, slow, and strategic path to getting there.

By now, just about every marketer knows the basics of how to rank.

Find and target the right keywords.

Create high-quality content that your audience is looking for.

Prove time and time again that Google should value your content – and that it’s worth showing off to their users.

It’s a tedious and time-consuming process.

And if you do happen to make it to the top slot, it can be snatched away by a competitor at any moment.

Do you ever wish there was a shortcut that would allow you to breeze right past the competition and secure your slot at the front of the pack?

There is an underutilized market that might allow you to leapfrog your competition in a ranking list.

Featured snippets.

Featured snippets can act like your race track to first place.

By targeting this up-and-coming feature, snippets can help you rank highly in less time.

What are featured snippets?

When searching on Google, have you ever noticed the text boxes that jump out and answer your question before you ever even make it to a website?

Well, that is a featured snippet.

These descriptive boxes flip the traditional Google search result listing around.

Rather than giving you the headline, URL, and website first, you get the information, otherwise known as the “snippet.”

Featured snippets can come in many different forms.

First, we have the paragraph featured snippet.

Do a quick Google search of “why is the sky blue,” and you’ll be met with this result:

why is the sky blue google search results

This box breaks down exactly what makes the sky blue is an example of a featured paragraph snippet.

The paragraph featured snippet is the most basic of all the snippet forms.

However, it’s the standard response to questions like “who is…” and “why is…”

For “how to” questions, you’re likely to get a list featured snippet.

Let’s say you clogged your drain and you’re looking for some help before calling the plumber.

You jump on to Google and search “how to unclog a drain.”

These are probably the results you’ll get…

unclog a drain google search results

Like the paragraph featured snippet, a list featured snippet provides the details first.

While less common, how to questions may also bring up a new kind of featured snippet – a video.

Let’s do a quick search for “how to braid hair.”

how to braid hair rich snippets on google search

The featured snippet you’re given is taken straight from YouTube. You can watch the content right on the results page.

You’ll also notice that the snippet offers additional options to make your search more specific.

These are known as refinement bubbles.

Refinement bubbles help to narrow down your search without needing to start the search over.

Another popular type of featured snippet is the table.

You’re most likely to see a table featured snippet after searching for comparisons or statistics.

Here is the result when you search “biggest growth industries” in Google.

biggest growth industries

As you can see, the CollegeBoard table is pulled directly to the top of the SERP.

Featured snippets like these now appear in about 30% of Google results.

However, featured snippets can cause some complications when it comes time for Google users to go back to your site.

According to a study from Ahrefs, only about 8.6% of clicks go to the featured snippet.

Compared to 19.6% of clicks to the first natural search result, this is a major difference.

average ctr of featured snippets

However, those 8.6% of clicks can still drive a massive wave of traffic to your website if you were previously struggling to reach the top of a SERP.

Featured snippets also have the added benefit of making your content competitive for voice searches.

With an estimated one billion voice searches each month, it’s an area you can’t afford to ignore.

When a user performs a voice search, the response played back to them is often a featured snippet.

In fact, Moz did a study to see how many featured snippet searches would deliver a voice response.

Pulling 1,000 searches that contained featured snippet results, they performed voice searches to see if the response matched.

71% of the time, the answer was yes.

However, they then broke down these results based on type.

Text snippets were 87% likely to be featured as a voice response.

List responses appeared about half the time, while tables only came up about a third of the time.

snippets with voice results by type

When we think about the nature of voice search, this isn’t too surprising.

While lists and tables make for great visual results on a traditional search engine, the ease of reading a snippet makes text much more practical for voice search.

As more and more individuals purchase voice-powered smart speakers, the need for appropriate responses will only become more important to brands.

However, there is no guarantee that you’ll land a featured snippet slot.

Like all things SEO, getting your content placed in a featured snippet slot takes some planning.

Here are the steps you need to follow to secure a featured snippet slot of your own.

1. Create content that answers a direct question

Featured snippets typically appear as a result of a direct question.

Moz posted a study on featured snippets where they compared results using the following question starters.

featured snippet questions

They found that most of these questions delivered paragraph featured snippets.

Questions beginning with “does,” “why,” and “are” resulted in paragraph featured snippets about 99.9% of the time.

“How” and “have” questions resulted in list featured snippets while “which” questions were the highest for table featured snippets.

Let’s take a look at the featured snippet that appears when you search “how to tie a tie.”

how to tie a tie rich snippet on google

When you type this question into the search bar, you’re given a featured snippet.

However, let’s look what happens when you simply search “tie a tie.”

tie a tie google search rich snippet

The results are much more basic.

Rather than the featured snippet, you’re given images and traditional results.

Simply targeting keywords associated with questions isn’t enough. To land the featured snippet placement, you need to be sure to include a direct question.

Let’s look at the way some other questions turn up on Google.

Say I want to learn more about who Mark Cuban is. I go to the search engine and just type in “Mark Cuban.”

This is my result.

mark cuban search result

While I’m able to pull some key information from this listing, the snippet isn’t the primary resource.

However, let’s turn my search into a question.

Here is my result for searching “Who is Mark Cuban.”

who is mark cuban rich snippets

By simply adding the “who is” to my search, we get an entirely new featured snippet.

Again, you’ll notice that the source of the featured snippet is not the same resource from the first search.

To secure the featured snippet placement for yourself, you want to be sure you’re targeting direct questions – not just keywords that may appear within the question.

If you’re trying to secure a list featured snippet, focus on “how to” questions.

Use “which” when trying to target table featured snippets.

Stick to the basics. “Who,” “how,” “why,” “when,” and “where” are all great places to start.

One way to cover a number of questions at once is through an FAQ or Q&A page.

Moz was able to help an orthodontist increase organic sessions to their website by 46.10% by targeting featured snippets through a Q&A.

organic sessions

A FAQ or Q&A page can help you cover many questions without overwhelming your visitors.

By providing short, scannable responses to questions you get asked frequently, you can provide high-value content to your target audience while also increasing your chances of getting a featured snippet slot.

However, you want to be strategic about the questions you target.

Which brings us to our next point…

2. Find the ranking opportunities unique to your audience

What is one of the key best practices when doing SEO?

Keyword research.

But what is one of the most important things to consider when doing keyword research?

Your audience.

If the keywords you target aren’t used by your audience, you may turn up in a search, but you’re not going to get any clicks.

Featured snippets work the same way.

Targeting just any slot is a waste of time and resources.

Instead, you want to get your featured snippets placed at the top of searches your audience is already looking for.

You can identify these ranking opportunities in a few different ways.

First, start with keyword research.

To rank for a featured snippet, you need to be among the Top 10 results for that keyword 99.58% of the time.

To identify snippets you may be able to be featured for, consider what keywords you’re already ranking highly for.

Next, think of a basic question that applies to your industry or business.

For this example, let’s use “what is AI.”

Here are our results.

what is ai google search results

While this doesn’t show a featured snippet, what we do get are some additional questions people are also searching for under “People Also Ask.”

Users can click one of the “People Also Ask” questions and get a short response.

what is ai software google question

These “People also ask” questions can be a great place to start learning about what your audience is looking for.

There are a few different ways you can find the questions your audience is asking.

One of the best places to look is on Quora.

Quora has 190 million monthly users, all asking questions, providing answers, and engaging in conversations.

Here is what you find when you search “what is AI” in Quora.

what is ai quora

In addition to a response, you’re also shown a list of related questions.

Like the “People Also Ask” section from your Google search, these questions can give you an idea of what people want to know.

Another great place to generate potential questions is Answer the Public.

By typing in a keyword, Answer the Public will generate some question responses.